Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela

a comparative perspective by Harold A. Trinkunas

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill

Written in English
Cover of: Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela | Harold A. Trinkunas
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Places:

  • Venezuela,
  • Venezuela.

Subjects:

  • Civil-military relations -- Venezuela -- History -- 20th century,
  • Democratization -- Venezuela,
  • Venezuela -- Politics and government -- 20th century

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementHarold A. Trinkunas.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF2325 .T75 2005
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3397368M
ISBN 10080782982X, 0807856509
LC Control Number2005010252

The importance of achieving institutionalized civilian control has been argued persuasively by Felipe Agüero, Soldiers, Civilians and Democracy: Post-Franco Spain in Comparative Perspective (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, ); J. Samuel Fitch, The Armed Forces and Democracy in Latin America (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, ); Harold Trinkunas, Crafting Civilian.   The supply of oil from Venezuela to Cuba is no longer as steady as it once was, due to the production troubles of the state-run oil company PDVSA. But . From a theoretical comparative civil-military relations viewpoint [1], Venezuela fails to meet most of the criteria of healthy relations. For example, the civilian government depends on the military as the primary means of internal security, the military has been employed against fellow citizenry in a policing role, civilian institutions are. In Venezuelan media reported that Venezuela had , military personnel in reserve, in addition to thousands of members of the civilian militia.

  The colectivos aren’t nearly as big as Venezuela’s armed forces — they number perhaps 5, to 7, members nationwide, most of them in cities, according to Alejandro Velasco, a history.   The same is true in most other countries where the military is unambiguously under civilian control. Venezuela used to be one of these countries until recently. El Salvador's troops deployed in congress. Bolivia's army advised the president to step down. Brazil's leader surrounds himself with top brass. The armed forces have made a comeback across the region. In January Venezuela’s opposition-led National Assembly swore in congressman Juan Guaidó as the country’s interim president. Guaidó’s claim to power is a severe blow against the already weakened government of Nicolás Maduro, whose re-election as president in May was widely rejected by the international community and deemed illegitimate by over 50 foreign governments.

Here’s Why Venezuela’s Military Prefers Chaos to a Coup. (Civilian-Military Union), perhaps the most damaging piece of know-how provided by the Cuban government in exchange for a few. The usually civilian or partly civilian executive control over the national military organization is exercised in democracies by an elected political leader as a member of the government's Cabinet, usually known as a Minister of Defense. (In presidential systems, such as the United States, the president is the commander-in-chief, and the. For decades, many Latin American countries had military dictators. In recent years, democratically elected civilians took control. Now, those civilian governments are bringing back the army. Features» Ma We Should Be Very Wary About the Growing Military Response to the Coronavirus Crisis. The reliance on the military for emergency response is a testament to the failures.

Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela by Harold A. Trinkunas Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book should have a prominent place in Latin American courses and should be mined for policy wisdom in every capital in the hemisphereAmericas [Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela] contributes substantially to the general discussion of how to establish civilian control over the armed forces.

Perhaps most important is Trinkunas's emphasis on the importance of competent civilian control over such critical areas as military Cited by: Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela Book Description: Unlike most other emerging South American democracies, Venezuela has not succumbed to a successful military coup d'etat during four decades of democratic rule.

The book should have a prominent place in Latin American courses and should be mined for policy wisdom in every capital in the hemisphere.—Americas [Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela] contributes substantially to the general discussion of how to establish civilian control over the armed forces.

Perhaps most important is Trinkunas's emphasis on the importance of competent civilian control over such critical areas as military Brand: The University of North Carolina Press.

Trinkunas examines Venezuela's transition to democracy following military rule and its failures and successes at attempts to institutionalize civilian control of its military over the past sixty years, a period that included three regime changes.

Harold Trinkunas answers these questions in an examination of Venezuela's transition to democracy following military rule and its attempts to institutionalize civilian control of the military over the past sixty years, a period that included three regime changes. Trinkunas first focuses on the strategic choices democratizers make about the military and how these affect the internal civil-military balance of.

Harold Trinkunas answers these questions in an examination of Venezuela's transition to democracy following military rule and its attempts to institutionalize civilian control of the military over the past sixty years, a period that included three regime : The University of North Carolina Press.

The author of this book answers these questions in an examination of Venezuela's transition to democracy following military rule and its attempts to institutionalize civilian control of the military over the past sixty years, a period that included three regime changes.

Chapter 1- Democracy and Civilian Control of the Armed Forces - Venezuela in Comparative Perspective 1. Chapter 2- A Lost Opportunity - The Failure of Democratization in Venezuela, – Chapter 3- The Transition to Democracy in Venezuela - Strategizing Civilian Control.

Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela by Harold A. Trinkunas,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(1). Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective by Harold A.

Trinkunas. Deborah L. Norden. Whittier College. Search for more papers by this author. Deborah L. Norden. Whittier College. Search for more papers Author: Deborah L. Norden. Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela [electronic resource]: a comparative perspective / Harold A.

Trinkunas. Main author: Trinkunas, Harold A. Corporate Author: Ebook Central Academic Complete., ProQuest (Firm) Format: eBook Online access: Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central. Read Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela by Harold A. Trinkunas for free with a 30 day free trial.

Read unlimited* books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Unlike most other emerging South American democracies, Venezuela has not succumbed to a successful military coup d'etat during four decades of democratic.

Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective eBook: Harold A. Trinkunas: : Kindle StoreAuthor: Harold A. Trinkunas. Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective (review) Article in Latin American Politics & Society 49(2) January with 10 Reads.

ISBN: X OCLC Number: Description: xiv, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: Democracy and civilian control of the armed forces: Venezuela in comparative perspective --A lost opportunity: the failure of democratization in Venezuela, --The transition to democracy in Venezuela: strategizing civilian control.

Summary: The transition from military rule to democracy in Venezuela has been sustained over four decades, during which time civilian control over the armed forces has become markedly institutionalised. This book explores the political forces at work in the country.

Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela: A comparative perspective Crafting civilian control of the military in Venezuela: A comparative perspective. even students of. Military Influence and Civilian Control in Venezuela A Neoinstitutional Approach by William Aviles Harold Trinkunas Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective.

Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, pp. Trinkunas's Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative. So, Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela is a failure, I think, but a successful one.

Eric M. Murphy is a mathematician, operations research analyst, and strategist for the United States Air Force. He is also an Editor at The Strategy Bridge. Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective.

Sanoja, Pedro // Journal of Political & Military Sociology;Winter, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p The article reviews the book "Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A. InVenezuela was given a second opportunity to democratize.

Unlike the initial failed attempt in –, democratization become successful and consolidated after Venezuelans had endured ten years of military authoritarian rule.

Focusing on the transition to democracy in Venezuela, this chapter describes the rise and fall of Venezuelan democracy, the decline of military autonomy. The question of “civilian control” or “how to guard the guardians” has been a central issue within the subfield of civil-military relations (CMR), since Plato’s Republicwritten more than years states need strong armies to defend their borders, but armed forces strong enough to protect the state also pose a threat to the civilian leadership.

According to Trinkunas, civilian control of the military can be applied in different degrees, depending on critical strategic choices made by politicians and civil society. These choices can assure civilian control (as in Spain, Chile, and Argentina) or might be.

Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective. University of North Carolina Press. ——— The Crisis in Venezuelan Civil-Military Relations: From Punto Fijo to the Fifth Republic, Latin American Research Review, Vol. 37, No. 1 (), 41– Villegas, Ernesto.

Abril, golpe adentro. Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective By Harold A. Trinkunas University of North Carolina Press, Read preview Overview Eroding Military Influence in Brazil: Politicians against Soldiers By Wendy Hunter University of North Carolina Press, Exit, Resistance, Loyalty: Military Behavior during Unrest in Authoritarian Regimes - Volume 14 Issue 1 - Holger Albrecht, Dorothy Ohl Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela.

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. Resistance, Loyalty: Military Behavior during Unrest in Authoritarian Regimes. This chapter explains how limited civilian control in the defense sector affects government efforts to develop military effectiveness in Indonesia’s nascent democracy.

In order to do so, military effectiveness is treated as a process of military change towards an effective force. 6 Harold A. Trinkunas, Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ).

T he C uba -V enezuela a llianCe. Jeanne K. Giraldo is Lecturer in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School. Harold A. Trinkunas is Associate Professor in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School.

He most recently authored Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective (). Harold Trinkunas is a nonresident and the author of “Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela" (University of North Carolina Press, ).

He co-edited and contributed to. Peter D. Feaver, ‘The Civil–Military Problematique: Huntington, Janowitz, and the Question of Civilian Control’, Armed Forces & Society, Winterpp. – Dale R. Herspring, The Pentagon and the Presidency: Civil-Military Relations From FDR to George W.

Bush (Manhattan, KS: University Press of Kansas, ), p. xii.Trinkunas has co-authored Militants, Criminals and Warlords: The Challenge of Local Governance in an Age of Disorder (Brookings Institution Press, ), Aspirational Power: Brazil’s Long Road to Global Influence (Brookings Institution Press, ) and authored Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela (University of North.The following Venezuelan Military Culture Findings Report, authored by Brian Fonseca, John Polga-Hecimovich, and Harold A.

Trinkunas, is the product of a working group held in Miami in which included seven U.S. and Venezuelan academic experts who have conducted research and written on Venezuelan military history and culture.